CURRENT AND UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Judy Chicago's "Birth Project: Born Again"

Travelling exhibition organized by Through the Flower
Curated by Viki Thompson Wylder

Pasadena Museum of California Art, Pasadena, CA., June 17 – October 7, 2018

Born Again features selected artworks from Judy Chicago’s Birth Project, a series of screen prints, needle works and textiles that first toured the United States during the mid-1980s. Chicago collaborated with over 150 experienced needle workers to create this series, which addressed the dearth of birth imagery in western art. Born Again takes a fresh look at the themes investigated in the Birth Project and considers their impact – art historically, societally and intellectually – 30 years after its creation.

http://pmcaonline.org/

Los Angeles, The Cool Years

Villa Arson

20 avenue stephen liégeard
F-06105 Nice cedex 2

July 1 – November 4, 2018

Ahead of her first retrospective in December 2018 at the Miami MOCA, the Villa
Arson is bringing together for the first time a large part of Judy Chicago’s works from
the 60s and early 70s: paintings, sculptures and installations including Feather
Room, which had never been re-created since 1965 and which will be presented in
the prestigious Galerie Carrée of the art center.

The curator of the exhibition, Geraldine Gourbe, a philosopher specialized
in Californian art from the 60s on, also wished to present the works of some other
West Coast artists. They all shared in Judy Chicago’s experimenting during these
cool years: Billy Al Bengston, Marcia Hafif, John McCracken, Robert Morris, Bruce
Nauman, Pat O’Neill and DeWain Valentine.
The selection sheds light on how Chicago’s work came to be, as well as on an
exceptional art scene; it makes the exhibition both a one-woman show and a group
show.

https://www.villa-arson.org/2018/05/los-angeles-les-annees-cool-judy-chicago/

Feminist Avantgarde of the 1970s. Works from the SAMMLUNG VERBUND Collection, Vienna

Traveling exhibition by SAMMLUNG VERBUND
Curated by Gabriele Schor

Stavanger Art Museum, Stavanger, Norway, June – September 2018
The Brno House of Arts, Brno, , Czech Republic, December 2018-March 2019

With greater energy than any artistic movement before, the feminist avant-garde of the 1970s deconstructed society’s image of womanhood, dismantling centuries’ worth of projections, stereotypes, and male hegemony. For the first time in the history of art, women, in an act of collective consciousness-raising, took the representation of their sex in visual art into their own hands and unfolded a wide spectrum of sel-determined female identities: provocative and radical, poetic and ironic. Gabriele Schor, director of the SAMMLUNG VERBUND Collection, coined the term the Feminist Avant-Garde in order to highlight the pioneering achievements of these artists.

https://www.verbund.com/en-de/about-verbund/responsibility/art-collection

Moments of Being: an exhibition based on the writings of Virginia Woolf

Pallant House: May 26 – September 16, 2018
The Fitzwilliam Museum: October 2 – December 9, 2018

Author of classic texts including To the Lighthouse and the pioneering feminist text A Room of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf spent much of her childhood in St Ives.

This exhibition is led by her writing, which will act as a prism through which to explore feminist perspectives on landscape, domesticity and identity in modern and contemporary art – with works by over 80 artists, including Laura Knight, Gwen John, Vanessa Bell, Winifred Nicholson, Sandra Blow, Barbara Hepworth, Claude Cahun, Dora Carrington and Judy Chicago.

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-st-ives/exhibition/virginia-woolf


News

New York Review Daily – A Place at the Table: An ExchangeAlthough I rarely respond to reviews, I feel compelled to respond to the July 8 essay by Esther Allen on the important “Radical Women” exhibition, now on view at the Brooklyn Museum. The writer misunderstands the nature of The Dinner Party, the historic context in which it was created, and, most important, the way in which I arrived at the plate images. As she stated, The Dinner Party is a symbolic history of women in Western civilization, but she completely ignores the “Heritage Floor,” which provides the literal and metaphoric foundation for the table. To focus only on “who’s at the table” is to over-simplify the art and ignore the criteria my studio team and I established and the limits we were working under. Click here for details

Artnet – Judy Chicago’s After-Party Is Here: The Pioneering Artist Gets a Major Museum Survey at the ICA MiamiFor decades, Judy Chicago has aimed to prove that she is much more than The Dinner Party. This winter in Miami, viewers will get a deeper look at just how much more there is to know.

The Institute of Contemporary Art Miami has announced plans to host a survey exhibition featuring pioneering feminist artist Judy Chicago, opening in early December, just in time for Art Basel in Miami Beach. Click here for details

Hyperallergic- New Plates by Judy Chicago Serve Up Feminist HistoryIn “The Dinner Party,” Judy Chicago’s famous triangular installation, plates serve up slices of women’s history, rather than food. Now, designs from the symbolic banquet are available to actually eat off, thanks to a new collaboration between the artist and homeware purveyor Prospect NY. The collection features replicas of four plates, crafted in fine bone china — and yes, they’re dishwasher safe. Click here for details

The New York Times – Women, Art and the Houses They Built by Alix StraussBy the late ’60s, Judy Chicago had just turned 30 and was already a fearless and unapologetic artist teaching at California State University at Fresno. There she created a pioneering, yearlong women’s art program. In 1971 she took a job teaching art at the California Institute of the Arts, or CalArts. Her groundbreaking curriculum went with her.

A year later, Womanhouse, an innovative and radical illustration of female expression, was up and running. The exhibit was created by Ms. Chicago and another artist and CalArts educator, Miriam Schapiro, who died in 2015.

A new installment, this one called Women House, is arriving this spring, highlighting another generation of contemporary women artists who reflect, dissect and address the same issues as its predecessors, this time in a gallery setting, using photography, sculpture and video. Click here for details

The New York Times – From ‘Vicious’ to Celebratory: The Times’s Reviews of Judy Chicago’s ‘The Dinner Party’ Judy Chicago was on her way to meet a friend in the Village when she first read Robert Hughes’s review of her work “The Dinner Party” in Time magazine. “I walked into the restaurant, put my head down on the bar and cried,” she says.

When it debuted in 1979, most art critics — including Hilton Kramer of The New York Times — panned “The Dinner Party,” which features three 48-foot-long tables assembled into a triangle with 39 intricate place settings, each dedicated to a notable woman. In his review, Mr. Kramer called it both “very bad” and “failed” art. “Nothing more obvious or accessible or didactic has been seen in an exhibition of contemporary art in a very long time,” he wrote, concluding that “to this male observer, it looks like an outrageous libel on the female imagination.” Click here for details

T Magazine – Judy Chicago, The Godmother by Sasha WeissIN A LARGE, low-lit room is a triangle-shaped table arranged with 39 place settings, the site of a distinguished gathering. It is laid with plates that rise a few inches off the table, as if levitating, each one sumptuously painted with wings or petals or licks of flame emanating from a glowing center: variations on the vulva. As you move along the table, which is 48 feet long on each side, the plates become small sculptures, bulbous and gleaming. Beneath them are runners embroidered with elaborate designs and names in gold thread — women of accomplishment who are familiar and unfamiliar, mythical and rarely spoken of: Sappho, the ancient poet; Anna Maria van Schurman, the 17th-century artist, thinker and theologian; Elizabeth Blackwell, the first female physician in the United States. The whole assemblage stands on a floor of luminescent triangular tiles covered in more gold — 999 names of other heroic women written in curling letters. The room is like a temple — a holy place, distinct from the everyday. Click here for details

ARTFORUM- Pussies Judy Chicago at Jessica Silverman Gallery“Pussies,” Judy Chicago’s first solo exhibition in San Francisco since her iconic installation The Dinner Party premiered there in 1979, presented paintings, drawings, and ceramic plates made between 1968 and 2004, many of which exemplified the feminist art practices pioneered by the artist in the 1960s and ’70s. The show felt timely not only because it occurred during … Click here for details

Interview Magazine – FEMINIST ART ICON JUDY CHICAGO ISN’T DONE FIGHTING By Gloria SteinemFor ten years now, Judy Chicago’s 20th-century masterpiece The Dinner Party has been on permanent view at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art in the Brooklyn Museum. It’s become such a fixture there that it is hard to imagine the shock and vitriol the piece caused when it was first displayed in 1979, after four years and hundreds of hands went into its production. The Dinner Party went against so many mores, even by progressive art-world standards: it was overtly political, its content directly Click here for details

The New Yoker – An Overdue Celebration for an Unruly Landmark of Feminist ArtWhat to do with Judy Chicago’s “The Dinner Party”? Put it on a pedestal, and many will shout it down, as several politicians (all men, all outraged) did, during a televised congressional debate, in 1990, when the art work was offered a permanent home, at a proposed museum at the University of the District of Columbia. Put it in storage, where it languished for the better part of fourteen years, between 1988 and 2002, and the injustice rankles. It’s likely that no one felt it more keenly than Chicago herself, who, when she heard of Elizabeth Sackler’s plans to acquire and build a center around the piece at the Brooklyn Museum, “fell into her soup,” Sackler told me recently. Click here for details

W- Why Judy Chicago, 78-Year-Old Feminist Godmother of Vagina Art, Is Having a Revival“V-a-g-i-n-a…” Judy Chicago, the 78-year-old feminist art pioneer, was painstakingly typing into her oversized smartphone last week when her husband, the photographer Donald Woodman, reached over and pointed out that the account she’d been searching for on Instagram, @vagina_china, had already popped up. “I mean, this would never have happened!” Chicago, who'd just shown me another favorite art account, @clubclitoris, exclaimed. “I just totally love it.”
In fact, we happened to be standing a few feet from a collection of ceramic vulva at the Brooklyn Museum that Chicago and a team of over 400 contributors spent more than five years laboring on in the '70s. Click here for details

i-D- judy chicago, our most important feminist artist, is finally getting a seat at the tableIn 1960, the artist Judy Chicago was an undergraduate student at the University of California. She remembers visiting the campus library one day and being shocked when she found its section on "Gender."

"There were books only on women, as if women are the only ones with a gender," she tells me over the phone from her home in New Mexico.

"It was an absence of thinking at that time and absence is always something that has interested me — the absence of information on women's history and absence of inquiry of masculinity." Click here for details

Dazed – That time artist Judy Chicago served vulvas for dinner When Judy Chicago unveiled “The Dinner Party” in San Francisco in 1979, she turned the art world upside down with the first epic work for the Feminist Art movement. Around an equilateral triangle table, she crafted elaborate place settings for 39 female figures from the history of western civilisation, beginning with the Primordial Goddess and ending with Georgia O’Keeffe. Along the way, viewers encounter Ishtar, Hatshepsut, Sappho, Theodora, Elizabeth I, Sacajawea, Soujourner Truth, Emily Dickinson, and Margaret Sanger, travelling from prehistoric times through the women’s revolution. Click here for details

Garage-We Need Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party Now, More Than Ever I was six years old. Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party—now also part-inspiration for some spectacular plates that adorned the tables at a recent dinner for the digital launch of GARAGE—was making its US tour and enjoying its debut in the artist's hometown (and source of her nom de plume). It was 1981. I remember listening to Marlo Thomas's Free To Be… You and Me over and over, and observing the way my father hung his head in a gesture of absolute defeat after Reagan won the presidential election. At the time, The Dinner Party was "contemporary," having been completed just two years previously, but to my child brain, and even now, it appears medieval, Arthurian, churchy—like something that's been around for millennia and insists on reverence. Click here for details

The Guardian- Judy Chicago: ‘In the 1960s, I was the only visible woman artist’When artist Judy Chicago was a student at the University of California in 1960, she had one question for her European history professor: “When are we going to learn about great women thinkers?” she asked.
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Her male professor promised Chicago he would talk about “women’s contributions” in the last class. But he lied – there were no great women thinkers in his curriculum. Click here for details

The Art Newspaper- Judy Chicago: Catwoman by Jori FinkelJudy Chicago is poised to make another comeback. With a dedication that few artists can match, she has been steadily making art and increasingly working on preserving her legacy, despite wild fluctuations in public opinion and critical reception. This autumn, her work will be especially prominent, with her early output presented in a new light. The gallerist Jessica Silverman has organised Chicago’s first major show in San Francisco (until 28 October), called Judy Chicago’s Pussies, with a nod to her pioneering vaginal imagery and more recent cat portraiture. Click here for details

ARTFORUM- Critic Picks by Anne PrentnieksIn this “grab her by the pussy” presidential era, symbolism seems insufficient as protest—and yet it drove the reclamation of a historically derogatory term for female anatomy, giving rise to thousands of pink hats with kitten ears. Likewise, in the works that make up “Judy Chicago’s Pussies,” Chicago explores the iconography of the pussy as both feminine core and feline house pet, channeling wit, fury, and the inherent bodily and metaphysical power of womanhood. Click here for details

The Cut- The Brooklyn Museum Revisits The Dinner Party by Judy ChicagoOne of the Brooklyn Museum’s most renowned artworks on permanent display is Judy Chicago’s 1979 installation The Dinner Party, a cavernous room on the fourth floor. Created by Chicago and a group of 400 workers and volunteers, the triangular dinner table imagines the contributions of female artists, religious leaders, political figures, and mythological characters are inextricably linked. Thirty-nine place settings are arranged for women including Virginia Woolf, Sojourner Truth, and Georgia O’Keeffe — set with golden chalices, polished silverware, and plates sculpted with shells and flowers to resemble vulvas. The names of 999 more women are engraved in gold on the white-tile floor below.

Click here for details

DCist- National Museum Of Women In The Arts Celebrates Judy Chicago’s Landmark ‘Dinner Party’ by Blair MurphyAs a young artist in the 1960’s, Judy Chicago faced a male-dominated art world and an art historical canon that all but ignored the contributions of women. She began researching women’s history, looking to her predecessors for guidance on how to navigate the world as a woman and an artist. That quest became the foundation for The Dinner Party, which became one of the most iconic artworks of the feminist art movement, and is now permanently installed at the Brooklyn Museum's Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Click here for details

Elephant Magazine- Potent Pussies in San Francisco by Leora LutzAdmittedly, I was excited when I heard that Jessica Silverman Gallery was going to be showing never-before-seen work by Judy Chicago. But then I was worried to see cat paintings were included—this is Judy Chicago, of The Dinner Party (1979) fame. What have we become? To traverse from monumental work about art history, women artists, male hierarchy, white male dominated art world, gender inequality—the list goes on—to cats. ‘This is a low time, we’re stepping backward,’ I thought… and simultaneously, ‘I have to see this.’ The show, Judy Chicago’s Pussies is not, but is about “her” various pussies. Click here for details

The New York Times T Magazine- In Art: A Heroine’s Journey by Liz HirschWe’re ‘‘ready for a different narrative about women,’’ says the artist Judy Chicago, fresh off seeing the summer blockbuster ‘‘Wonder Woman.’’ Chicago — who, after taking her hometown’s name partly as a symbolic rebuke of the patriarchy, famously posed as a boxer in the ring for a 1970 Artforum ad — knows a thing or two about the politics of representation. Now, at 78, she’s soon to be the subject of a number of important shows. Click here for details

National Museum of Women in the Arts announces creation of Judy Chicago Visual ArchiveThe National Museum of Women in the Arts announced the creation of the Judy Chicago Visual Archive at the museum’s Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center. The archive will document Chicago’s career through photographs, slides, negatives and printed ephemera. These materials span the 1960s through the present and capture fleeting performance pieces such as her pyrotechnics and dry ice works, as well as exhibitions of drawings, paintings, sculpture and installations, including The Dinner Party. The visual archive will be an essential resource for researchers. Click here for details

Artsy- When Judy Chicago Rejected a Male-Centric Art World with a Puff of Smoke by Alexxa GotthardtIn 1968, several years after she graduated from the MFA program at UCLA, Chicago had begun a series called “Atmospheres.” In the first iteration, she used smoke machines to cloak a Pasadena street in a shroud of ethereal white mist. “It softened everything,” she recalls of the vapor’s effects. “There was a moment when the smoke began to clear, but a haze lingered. And the whole world was feminized—if only for a moment.” Click here for details

Judy Chicago: Four Lads From LiverpoolJudy discusses her mural on site in Liverpool. Click here for details

Judy Chicago, Canaletto and Marc Quinn: this week’s best UK exhibitionsThe artist renowned for her installation The Dinner Party (1974-79), the first explicitly feminist artwork to win mass fame, celebrates an earlier pop icon, the Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. She marks the 50th anniversary of the album with a mural called Fixing a Hole, playing with the psychedelic hues of the 60s to turn a grain silo at Stanley Dock into a colossal work of art. Click here for details

The Seen- Potent Pussy // Judy Chicago by Natalie HegertNatalie Hegert interviews Judy Chicago about her cat paintings from 1999-2004 and her long history of intersectional feminism. Click here for details

Judy Chicago on the Beatles: ‘They represent things we have lost – hope and freedom’For Sgt Pepper’s 50th anniversary, the great psychedelic visionary of feminist art has created a giant mop-top mural inspired by Fixing a Hole – a song that sums up what she has spent her entire career doing Click here for details

International Honor Quilt Exhibition Receives Regional Exhibition AwardThe Southeastern Museum Conference awards the Hite Art Institute at the University of Louisville with a silver award for the exhibition "Capturing Women's History: Quilts, Activism, & Storytelling" that was on display from February 1 - March 19, 2016. The "International Honor Quilt" is a collaborative, grassroots feminist art project initiated by Judy Chicago in 1980 to "extend the spirit of The Dinner Party". Click here for details

ARTnews: “Jessica Silverman Gallery Now Represents Judy Chicago”Alex Greenberger 07.18.2016
"San Francisco’s Jessica Silverman Gallery announced today that it now represents Judy Chicago, the feminist-art pioneer whose work deals with female sexuality and the role of women throughout art history. The news comes two months after New York’s Salon 94 gallery also said it would represent the artist." Click here for details

New York Times Exclusive: “Judy Chicago Does TV”Robin Pogrebin 05.05.2016
Judy Chicago is now represented by the New York gallery, Salon 94, founded by Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn. Also announced in the New York Times: "Jill Soloway, creator of the acclaimed Amazon television series 'Transparent,' is ... making an Amazon series based on Womanhouse, the 1972 feminist art space that Ms. Chicago organized with Miriam Schapiro." Click here for details

ARTnews: “A Few Delights at Frieze New York”Andrew Russeth 05.05.2016
"Probably the biggest surprise of the fair for me, literally and figuratively: Judy Chicago's EU-22 Earth Birth, 1983. This beauty is 6 feet tall and 11 feet long, and it explodes off the wall while also sucking you in. It was at the booth of Salon 94, which is now showing Chicago."
Click here for details

New York Times Art Review: “Frieze New York, a Visual Circus Under the Big Top”Holland Cotter 05.05.2016
"There's a beauty at the New York gallery Salon 94, where Judy Chicago's moody, spray-painted 1983 "Earth Birth" is on the same fluid wavelength as a picture by the Sudanese painter Ibrahim el-Salahi, and both gain in sensuality from the contrasting presence of tough pieces by the great Pakistan-born American sculptor Huma Bhabha and the Japanese ceramist Kentaro Kawabata." Click here for details

Temporary Art ReviewJudy Chicago's interview is featured in Temporary Art Review with insights into the exhibition "Why Not Judy Chicago?" and Judy Chicago's thoughts on feminist practice and art. Click here for details

Judy Chicago featured in French national newspaper LiberationThe title is a play on a phrase from the French revolution, "Phallus, the people will defeat you", and refers to curator Xabier Arakistain's thesis in the exhibition "Why Not Judy Chicago?", that from the beginning of Chicago's career she has been challenging the structure of phallocentric culture through her art, writing and teaching. Click here for details

International Honor Quilt in the NewsThe "International Honor Quilt" at the Hite Art Institute is being recognized as an extraordinary work of collaborative quilting, activism and storytelling that served as the inspiration for the AIDS Memorial Quilt. Click here for details

University of Louisville’s Hite Art InstituteThe University of Louisville's Hite Art Institute celebrates Judy Chicago, feminist art and social engagement this month! Click here for details

Frieze Magazine interviews Judy ChicagoFrieze Magazine interviews Judy Chicago for the Jan-Feb 2016 issue. Click here for insight into Chicago's studio practice, work that matters to her, and what changes she would like to see in the world. Click here for details

Xabier Arakistain’s curatorial statement for Why Not Judy ChicagoClick here for Xabier Arakistain's curatorial statement for Why Not Judy Chicago?, the traveling solo exhbition of Judy Chicago's work that both celebrates Chicago's oeuvre and challenges the ongoing insitutional restistance to her work. The exhibition is on now at Azkuna Zentroa in Bilbao, Spain. Click here for details

SFMOMA San Francisco Museum of Modern ArtSFMOMA San Francisco Museum of Modern Art posted this video of Judy Chicago recounting her experience as one of the only women on the Los Angeles art scene in the late 1960s and 1970s. Female Rejection Drawing from the Rejection Quintet, 1974, is in SFMOMA's collection. Click here for details

BBC Woman’s Hour interviewed Judy ChicagoBBC Woman's Hour interviewed Judy Chicago. Listen to Chicago discuss her career, her London exhibitions, and her upcoming exhibition "Why Not Judy Chicago?" in Bilbao, Spain. Tune in at minute 13:45. Click here for details

Watch the BBC London’s segment on the Tate Modern’s exhibitionWatch the BBC London's segment on the Tate Modern's exhibition "The World Goes Pop" including an interview with Judy Chicago! Click here for details

Judy Chicago discusses her London exhibitionsJudy Chicago discusses her London exhibitions, her artistic practice, and what it means to be a woman in this interview for TimeOut London. Click here for details

Studio International interviewJudy Chicago talks about her career trajectory, the continuing need for feminist art, and the way in which she hopes to spend her remaining years. Click here for details

UK Independent – Tate Modern’s autumn show, The World Goes Pop, finally gives female pop artists their duesMarilyn Monroe’s face, printed over and over again. Cartoon-strip women embraced by lovers or crying on the phone. Some of the most famous works of Pop Art certainly make use of the female image – but they were made by the big poster boys of the mid-20th century movement, Click here for details

The Talks – JUDY CHICAGO: “GET USED TO IT!” "I hope that they’ll say that I made a contribution to art history. That was my goal from the time I was a little girl. That was what I’ve been intent on doing all along, to make a contribution to art. That’s what my life has been about. And trying to demonstrate that women have as much to say as men. They’re just as worthy to be in our museums and our history books – that’s what my life has been about, and that’s what I’ve been hoping to prove. That gives meaning to life. And purpose." Click here for details

Artsy – The Most Iconic Artists of the 1970s Across the globe, the 1970s art world was shaken by reverberations from the social and political climate ignited in the previous decade—though the ideas proliferating in the realm of artmaking were still tethered to formalist concerns and intellectual inquiry. The creation and reception of both land art and feminist art were indebted to the hippie movement and student protests of the late 1960s. Click here for details

Newsweek – Ten Works of Art that Have Rocked the Ages Controversial art is no doubt as old as the prehistoric cave paintings. From emperors to mayors, artists and politicians have been natural adversaries. Here are some of the more explosive clashes. Click here for details

ARTFORUM – Judy Chicago, Talking to Lucy R. Lippard You've been showing your work for about 11 years now, but there's never been an article on it, so let's start from scratch. Ok. When I first started my professional life, in 1963, I was making these very biomorphic paintings and sculptures; I went to auto-body school, because I wanted to learn to spray paint and because it seemed another way to prove my "seriousness" to the male art world. Click here for details

Judy Chicago can be reached at: PO Box 1327, Belen, NM 87002 505-861-1499, info@judychicago.com
© All material copyright Chicago/Woodman LLC 2018