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Contact

For all inquiries, general information, interviews and lectures please contact: Ron Longe ron@ronlonge.com   Megan Schultz megan@judychicago.com

For copyright and reproduction requests of Judy Chicago’s works please contact: Artists Rights Society http://www.arsny.com/ info@Arsny.com T: 212.420.9160

For the digital image files for reproduction requests please contact: Art Resource http://www.artres.com/ requests@artres.com T: 212.505.8700

Selected Articles on Judy Chicago

The newest articles can be found in Exhibitions and News

CBS Sunday Morning – Artist Judy Chicago on making a name for herself"The Dinner Party," a triangular table set for 39 singular women – Virginia Woolf, Sojourner Truth, and Georgia O'Keeffe among them – with the names of nearly a thousand others on the floor around it, in porcelain and needlework, has a spiritual, "Last Supper" quality, intentionally. "I wanted to substitute female heroes for male heroes," artist Judy Chicago said of her work.

Women volunteers did the sewing. "All those anonymous stitchers in the ecclesiastical embroidery class making vestments in praise of male power, male deity – what if we took our own techniques and put them in service to our own achievements?" she told correspondent Martha Teichner. "It tells this story of centuries of struggle, achievement, erasure; struggle, achievement, erasure." Click here for details

The Art Newspaper – The Big Review: Judy Chicago at De Young MuseumLike many women of her generation, Judy Chicago had to fight for her rights and for a modicum of the attention that accrued to far less talented men. And from time to time—starting, perhaps, with that famous 1970 photograph showing her in the corner of a boxing ring, gloves on—she has played with her own reputation for being a fighter. Click here for details

The Guardian – ‘I’m that little lady who made all this big stuff!’: Judy Chicago’s 60 years of monumental feminist artCriticized at the time for an over-emphasis on white women and its stylized representations of vaginas, Judy Chicago’s room-sized installation The Dinner Party has only recently come to be seen as a canonical example of late-20th-century art.

At times, The Dinner Party has overshadowed the rest of Chicago’s prodigious output, and she has professed a distaste for revisiting it or rethinking the list of invitees. When a museum director informed Chicago 40 years ago that it would be the culmination of her career, she says she responded with, “I’m just getting started.” Click here for details