Judy Chicago Judy Chicago in Frieze New York

2016 - Judy Chicago in Frieze New York

Judy Chicago's 1983 work Earth Birth from the Birth Project was showcased in Salon 94's Frieze New York booth. The New York gallery, founded by Jeanne Greenberg-Rohatyn, represents Judy Chicago. The work received accolades in both the New York Times and ARTnews art reviews. In ARTnews, Andrew Russeth writes, "Probably the biggest surprise of the fair for me, literally and figuratively: Judy Chicago's EU-22 Earth Birth, 1983. This beauty is 6 feet tall and 11 feet long, and it explodes off the wall while also sucking you in. It was at the booth of Salon 94, which is now showing Chicago." Image courtesy of Salon 94, New York

Judy Chicago Judy Chicago in Frieze New York 2016

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Judy Chicago <i>New York Times</i> Exclusive:
Judy Chicago <i>New York Times</i> Exclusive:

2016 - New York Times Exclusive: "Judy Chicago Does TV"

Paige Pogrebin 05.05.16 Judy Chicago is now represented by the New York gallery, Salon 94, founded by Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn. Also announced in the New York Times: "Jill Soloway, creator of the acclaimed Amazon television series 'Transparent,' is ... making an Amazon series based on Womanhouse, the 1972 feminist art space that Ms. Chicago organized with Miriam Schapiro."

Judy Chicago Interview with Hans Ulrich Obrist

2015 - Interview with Hans Ulrich Obrist

Frieze week in London: Judy Chicago was interviewed by curator, critic, and art historian, Hans Ulrich Obrist, for the Transformation Marathon.

Judy Chicago Interview with Hans Ulrich Obrist 2015

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Judy Chicago <i>Why Not Judy Chicago?</i> 2015
Judy Chicago <i>Why Not Judy Chicago?</i>

2015 - Why Not Judy Chicago?

Curated by renowned feminist curator Xabier Arakistain and drawing from works across Chicago’s career, this exhibition both celebrates Chicago's oeuvre and challenges the ongoing institutional resistance to her work. The exhibition opened at Azkuna Zentroa in Bilbao, Spain, and is currently on view at the CAPC musée d'art contemporain in Bordeaux, France, through September 4th, 2016!

Judy Chicago <i>The World Goes Pop</i> at the Tate Modern

2015 - The World Goes Pop at the Tate Modern

This groundbreaking reassessment of Pop Art surveyed global engagements with Pop, its origins and its socio-political underpinnings. The exhibition brought together three of Chicago’s seminal Car Hoods.

Judy Chicago <i>The World Goes Pop</i> at the Tate Modern 2015

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Judy Chicago Expo Milano 2015 2015
Judy Chicago Expo Milano 2015

2015 - Expo Milano 2015

Judy Chicago's work was included in two exhibitions in conjunction with Expo Milano 2015 -- Arts & Foods, curated by Germano Celant, and The Great Mother, curated by Massimiliano Gioni.

Judy Chicago <i>Institutional Time</i>

2014 - Institutional Time

In her latest book, Chicago discusses her own art pedagogy and proposes ways that studio art education can be improved for the current generation of artists. Tackling such topics as sexism and bias that many young artists face, this radical and constructive critique is a must-read for a new perspective on studio art education.

Judy Chicago <i>Institutional Time</i> 2014

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Judy Chicago <i>Heads Up</i> 2014
Judy Chicago <i>Heads Up</i>

2014 - Heads Up

"I want to translate particular experiences into universal observations" -- Judy Chicago
Chicago's series Heads Up includes watercolors, sketches, two-dimensional painted glass and three-dimensional cast glass and ceramic heads. Chicago worked on the series from 2007 - 2013, and the work debuted at David Richard Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 2014.

Judy Chicago <i>A Butterfly for Brooklyn</i>

2014 - A Butterfly for Brooklyn

To celebrate her seventy-fifth birthday, Judy Chicago drew inspiration from her earliest explorations of feminist imagery to create a monumental pyrotechnic performance piece, A Butterfly for Brooklyn, in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park on April 26th, 2014. The site-specific work measuring approximately 200 feet wide by 180 feet high levitated and swirled before 12,000 viewers. Presented by the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum in partnership with Prospect Park Alliance, with major funding from Barbara and Eric Dobkin, the project was an outdoor component of the exhibition Chicago in L. A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1962-1974 at the Sackler Center at the Brooklyn Museum.

Judy Chicago <i>A Butterfly for Brooklyn</i> 2014

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Judy Chicago Judy Chicago celebrates 75 years! 2014
Judy Chicago Judy Chicago celebrates 75 years!

2014 - Judy Chicago celebrates 75 years!

A series of exhibitions and events are held around the country at various institutions and galleries including the Palmer Museum at Penn State University, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, Mana Contemporary in Jersey City, the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum, the New Mexico Museum of Art, David Richard Gallery in Santa Fe, and Redline in Denver.

Judy Chicago <i>The Very Best of Judy Chicago</i>

2014 - The Very Best of Judy Chicago

Mana Contemporary and Nyehaus presented this major survey of key works from Chicago’s career and one of the select nationwide exhibitions and events celebrating the artist’s 75th birthday.

Judy Chicago <i>The Very Best of Judy Chicago</i> 2014

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Judy Chicago Frieze Masters London 2013
Judy Chicago Frieze Masters London

2013 - Frieze Masters London

Chicago's early work was showcased by Riflemaker Gallery and Nyehaus for Frieze Masters London.

Judy Chicago <i>Judy Chicago: Deflowered</i> at Nye + Brown

2012 - Judy Chicago: Deflowered at Nye + Brown

This solo exhibition at Nye + Brown in Culver City. California, showcased Judy Chicago's early abstract works from the '60s, as well a comprehensive survey of works made while Judy Chicago was living in Los Angeles between 1961-1973. Tim Nye and Lexi Brown commissioned Judy Chicago to create an entirely new fireworks piece for the opening, titled The Deflowering of Nye + Brown. Working with Pyro Spectaculars, Chicago framed the gallery entrance with a series of petal forms that ignited and burst into rhythmic explosions.

Judy Chicago <i>Judy Chicago: Deflowered</i> at Nye + Brown 2012

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Judy Chicago MAD 2011
Judy Chicago MAD

2011 - MAD

In early 2011, the Museum of Art and Design in New York presented the first survey of Judy Chicago’s work in tapestry which dates back to the mid 1970’s. This body of art - woven by Chicago’s long-time collaborator, Audrey Cowan - was gifted to the museum by Audrey and her husband Bob.

Judy Chicago <i>Pacific Standard Time</i>

2011 - Pacific Standard Time

Judy Chicago was actively involved in Pacific Standard Time, a Getty funded initiative involving almost every institution from Santa Barbara to San Diego, documenting and celebrating Southern California art from 1945-1980, more than 20 of which years, Chicago was working in Los Angeles. Chicago’s work was exhibited in eight museum shows (including the Getty, LAMOCA, Otis Art Institute, the Pomona College Art Museum and the Pasadena Museum of California Art). Chicago kicked off the Getty PST Performance Festival with the restaging of two events, Sublime Environment (a dry ice installation) and A Butterfly for Brooklyn, the first fireworks piece Chicago created since 1974.

Judy Chicago <i>Pacific Standard Time</i> 2011

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Judy Chicago Judy Chicago Art Education Archive at Penn State 2011
Judy Chicago Judy Chicago Art Education Archive at Penn State

2011 - Judy Chicago Art Education Archive at Penn State

Penn State University acquired Judy Chicago's art education archive, now housed in the University Archives in the Special Collections Library on campus, as well as online. The Judy Chicago Art Education Collection is a living archive on feminist art education.

Judy Chicago <i>Face to Face: Frida Kahlo</i>

2010 - Face to Face: Frida Kahlo

Written by Judy Chicago with art historian Frances Borzello, Face to Face: Frida Kahlo has handpicked a selection of Kahlo's work, a hundred portraits that speak to the full spectrum of women's experience. The result is a fascinating conversation between two artistic icons.

Judy Chicago <i>Face to Face: Frida Kahlo</i> 2010

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Judy Chicago <i>The Dinner Party</i> Curriculum Project 2009
Judy Chicago <i>The Dinner Party</i> Curriculum Project

2009 - The Dinner Party Curriculum Project

Through the Flower made available The Dinner Party curriculum aimed at K-12 school teachers, created by Chicago in collaboration with Dr. Constance Gee, a well-known art educator, who brought together a select group of curriculum writers. A summer workshop program to train art teachers in The Dinner Party curriculum is offered at Kutztown University.

Judy Chicago Permanent Housing

2007 - Permanent Housing

The Dinner Party opened in its new permanent housing at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum in a specially designed exhibition space, created along with an educational database, ancillary exhibitions and programs. Also, in conjunction with the opening of the Sackler Center and The Dinner Party, Global Feminisms opened at the museum, an exhibition curated by Maura Reilly and Linda Nochlin, the renowned art historian. This exhibit demonstrated the global impact of the Feminist Art Movement that Chicago helped initiate in the early seventies when she went to Fresno to create a Feminist Art Practice.

Judy Chicago Permanent Housing 2007

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Judy Chicago <i>WACK</i> 2007
Judy Chicago <i>WACK</i>

2007 - WACK

WACK: Art and the Feminist Revolution, curated by Connie Butler, opened at the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art. This was the first major survey of Feminist art, chronicling the revolutionary art movement that ushered in a historic change, i.e. the first time women were able to openly work out of their experiences as women.

Judy Chicago <i>Becoming Judy Chicago</i>

2007 - Becoming Judy Chicago

Dr. Gail Levin’s biography, Becoming Judy Chicago was published in conjunction with the exhibition, Judy Chicago: Jewish Identity, curated by Gail Levin and Laura Kruger, curator of Hebrew Union Gallery in New York. The exhibition explored the ways in which Chicago’s Jewish background impacted her life and work.

Judy Chicago <i>Becoming Judy Chicago</i> 2007

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Judy Chicago <i>Chicago in Glass</i> 2006
Judy Chicago <i>Chicago in Glass</i>

2006 - Chicago in Glass

Chicago in Glass opened at LewAllen Contemporary in Santa Fe, a survey of Chicago’s two and three dimensional work in stained glass, fused, cast, etched and painted glass. Chicago explored this new media and transformed a challenging technique into a vehicle for personal expression. She continues to work in glass, particularly cast and kiln fired glass painting.

Judy Chicago <i>Kitty City</i> published

2005 - Kitty City published

Chicago premiered KittyCity: A Feline Book of Hours, a series of watercolors that were also collected in a lavishly illustrated book based upon a traditional Book of Hours but in this instance, chronicling a day in the life of the Chicago/Woodman’s household, which was home to six cats. In conjunction with the publication of the book and exhibitions around the country, Chicago worked with animal rescue agencies around the country to do cat adoptions.

Judy Chicago <i>Kitty City</i> published 2005

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Judy Chicago <i>The Dinner Party</i> Acquired and Gifted 2002
Judy Chicago <i>The Dinner Party</i> Acquired and Gifted

2002 - The Dinner Party Acquired and Gifted

The Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation acquired and gifted The Dinner Party (1974-79) to the Brooklyn Museum with the intention of permanently housing it in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, the first such institution in the world. At this same time the Brooklyn Museum exhibited The Dinner Party for a second time (a prior exhibition was held in 1980) but this time, the critical climate had dramatically changed. Instead of the hostile and vitriolic reception originally accorded The Dinner Party by the mainstream critics, it was hailed by Roberta Smith in the New York Times who described the piece as “...almost as much a part of American culture as Norman Rockwell, Walt Disney, the WPA murals and the AIDS quilts.” and “...as getting better all the time."

Judy Chicago A Return to Teaching

1999 - A Return to Teaching

Chicago returned to teaching, doing semester long project classes, that culminated in exhibitions, at institutions around the country, including: Indiana University, Bloomington, IN; Duke University, Durham, NC; Western Kentucky University Bowling Green, KY; Cal-Poly, Pomona, CA; and Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN. Several films were made about her unique teaching methods which had their roots in the Feminist art programs of the 1970’s. In 2001, she began team-teaching with Donald Woodman, which allowed her to extend her feminist-based pedagogy to include men.

Judy Chicago A Return to Teaching 1999

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Judy Chicago Home at the Belen Hotel 1996
Judy Chicago Home at the Belen Hotel

1996 - Home at the Belen Hotel

Chicago and Woodman moved into the Belen Hotel in Belen, New Mexico, a historic railroad hotel on the National Register of Historic Places, after a three-year renovation/restoration by Woodman. This is the first home of their own either of them has ever had.

Judy Chicago <i>Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist</i>

1996 - Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist

Judy Chicago published the second volume of her autobiography, which unabashedly probes the issues of gender, power and history that also characterize her monumental works, and asks hard questions about art in our culture.

Judy Chicago <i>Beyond the Flower: The Autobiography of a Feminist Artist</i> 1996

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Judy Chicago The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America 1996
Judy Chicago The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America

1996 - The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America

Chicago's archives are housed at the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, which documents the lives of women of the past and present for the future. Chicago recalled the first time she visited the library, "I was so overwhelmed I burst into tears because we have so few institutions of our own.”

Judy Chicago <i>Resolutions: A Stitch in Time</i>

1994 - Resolutions: A Stitch in Time

From 1994 to 2000, Chicago created a series of painted and needleworked images re-interpreting traditional proverbs for a multi-cultural future with a select group of needleworkers in the project Resolutions: A Stitch in Time. Described by renowned British art writer Edward Lucie-Smith in his 1999 monograph, Judy Chicago: An American Vision, as a “post-modern project that subverts the traditions of both needlework and proverbs.” The exhibition was curated by David Revere McFadden, senior curator at the Museum of Art and Design in NY, where it premiered in 2000, subsequently traveling to museums in the U.S. and Canada.

Judy Chicago <i>Resolutions: A Stitch in Time</i> 1994

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Judy Chicago Through the Flower in New Mexico 1990
Judy Chicago Through the Flower in New Mexico

1990 - Through the Flower in New Mexico

Through the Flower moved from Benicia, California, to New Mexico, starting a series of public programs and art workshops. It is headquartered in Belen, New Mexico. Currently, Through the Flower has refocused its activities so that it can fulfill its mission to educate a broad public about the importance of art and its power in countering the erasure of women’s achievements through providing resource and research materials through our institutional partners.

Judy Chicago <i>Holocaust Project: From Darkness into Light</i>

1985 - Holocaust Project: From Darkness into Light

From 1985 -1993, Judy Chicago and Donald Woodman worked on the Holocaust Project: From Darkness into Light, a journey into the darkness of the Holocaust which resulted in an exhibition that combined painting and photography to explore the meaning of the Holocaust in a contemporary context. It is introduced by a monumental tapestry suggesting that the Holocaust grew out of the ‘fabric’ of Western Civilization and concludes with a large stained glass installation, Rainbow Shabbat: A Vision for the Future.

Judy Chicago <i>Holocaust Project: From Darkness into Light</i> 1985

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Judy Chicago
Judy Chicago

1985 - "And then all will live in harmony with each other and the Earth"

After a whirlwind romance, Judy Chicago and photographer Donald Woodman married. Their wedding was officiated by a female rabbi, and they explored Jewish tradition together and learned about their Jewish heritage. Judy Chicago's Merger Poem was sung at the ceremony.

Judy Chicago <i>PowerPlay</i>

1982 - PowerPlay

From 1982-1987, Judy Chicago worked on the series PowerPlay, an examination of the construct of masculinity in drawings, paintings, sculptures, weavings, cast paper and bronze.

Judy Chicago <i>PowerPlay</i> 1982

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Judy Chicago <i>Birth Project</i> 1980
Judy Chicago <i>Birth Project</i>

1980 - Birth Project

Chicago settled in Benicia, California, to start the Birth Project (1980-85), a series of painted and needle-worked images celebrating creation and the glory and pain of the birth experience, the joy and challenges of pregnancy and the sense of entrapment that often accompanies the satisfaction of giving life. Mary Ross coordinated the collaborative effort over the five years it took to create. Through the Flower moved into an 11,000-square-foot building in Benicia’s industrial park. Unlike The Dinner Party (1974-79), where needleworkers gathered at Chicago's studio, Birth Project volunteers worked at home, periodically visiting Benicia for reviews. Chicago also traveled around the country, visiting the volunteers to review their work at their homes.

Judy Chicago <i>The Dinner Party</i> Premiere

1979 - The Dinner Party Premiere

The Dinner Party (1974-79) opened at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, with the support of Museum Director Henry Hopkins. Feminist programs and activities accompanied the opening, marking the first time a mainstream museum opened its doors to feminist culture. Opening night drew 5,000 people; more than 100,000 people viewed the work during its three-month run. For the most part, the art press was outraged by the butterfly/vagina imagery but that was lost in the avalanche of popular media. In 1980, The Dinner Party re-opened at the Clearlake campus of the University of Houston, thanks to the efforts of Mary Ross Taylor who became the administrator of Chicago's nonprofit, Through the Flower. Under the guidance of exhibit administrator Diane Gelon, The Dinner Party began an unprecedented, grassroots-fueled worldwide tour to six countries, three continents and was seen by more than one million people.

Judy Chicago <i>The Dinner Party</i> Premiere 1979

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Judy Chicago Through the Flower 1978
Judy Chicago Through the Flower

1978 - Through the Flower

In 1978, Chicago established Through the Flower, a 501(c) non-profit corporation to manage the avalanche of small donations supporting The Dinner Party’s completion. Its original mission of providing a fiscal structure for donations to help complete The Dinner Party quickly evolved, and soon Through the Flower began to organize the worldwide exhibition tour that brought The Dinner Party to sixteen venues in six countries and three continents to over one million viewers. Through the Flower has supported numerous projects since its inception. Through the Flower's mission is to educate a broad public about the importance of art and its power in countering the erasure of women’s achievements.

Judy Chicago <i>Through the Flower</i>

1975 - Through the Flower

Doubleday published Through the Flower: My Struggle as a Woman Artist in March. It subsequently was published in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, Japan and Taiwan.

Chicago firmed up her vision of The Dinner Party (1974-79), a symbolic history of women in Western civilization, as a triangular shaped table with 39 place settings, 13 plates to a side, and spanning time from the mythical Primordial Goddess to women in Twentieth Century.

Judy Chicago <i>Through the Flower</i> 1975

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Judy Chicago <i>The Dinner Party</i> 1974
Judy Chicago <i>The Dinner Party</i>

1974 - The Dinner Party

Chicago stopped teaching to work on The Dinner Party (1974-79). She conceived of the work as a reinterpretation of The Last Supper from “the point of view of those who’ve done the cooking throughout history." Her butterfly motif images would rise off the plates, symbolizing women’s struggle for freedom.

Hundreds of volunteers joined The Dinner Party production crew. All total, 400 men and women worked on the installation, from needleworkers to industrial designers, as well as 20 researchers who helped compile the 999 names on the Heritage Floor.

Judy Chicago <i>A Butterfly for Oakland</i>

1974 - A Butterfly for Oakland

Chicago created A Butterfly for Oakland out of 200 road flares outlining a butterfly, to be lit at sunset. A Butterfly for Oakland shimmered for 17 minutes on the shore of Lake Merritt as part of a "Sculpture in the City" project by the Oakland Museum.

Judy Chicago <i>A Butterfly for Oakland</i> 1974

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Judy Chicago Feminist Studio Workshop and Woman's Building 1973
Judy Chicago Feminist Studio Workshop and Woman's Building

1973 - Feminist Studio Workshop and Woman's Building

Chicago collaborated with art historian Arlene Raven and designer Sheila de Bretteville to open the Feminist Studio Workshop and Woman’s Building, a public center for women's culture, in Los Angeles in 1973. Five-thousand people came to the opening. Judy Chicago, Sheila Levrant de Bretteville and Arlene Raven are pictured.

Judy Chicago 1973

1973 - 1973

America’s sexual revolution was in full swing and Chicago poured her energy into her art, delving deeper into expressing the range of female experiences that are emblematic of her work. In 1973, Chicago spray painted such landmark works as Through the Flower, Heaven is for White Men Only and Let It All Hang Out. In addition, Chicago began writing Through the Flower: My Struggle as a Woman Artist.”

Judy Chicago 1973 1973

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Judy Chicago 1972 1972
Judy Chicago 1972

1972 - 1972

Intrigued by a hand-painted porcelain plate she saw at an antique store, Chicago began studying china painting. Not one for painting rose buds, Chicago eventually found a mentor, Rosemarie Radmaker, who appreciated her desire to apply this fusion of color to a glazed porcelain surface for her own images.

Judy Chicago <i>Womanhouse</i>

1972 - Womanhouse

Chicago moved the Feminist Art Program to the California Institute of the Arts (Cal Arts) and began team teaching with Miriam Schapiro. The 21 women in the program renovated a dilapidated old house at 553 Mariposa Avenue in Hollywood. They worked non-stop for three months, repairing the house as well as creating their revolutionary installations. Womanhouse is the first openly female-centered art installation in contemporary art, and attracted wide media publicity as well as more than 10,000 people during its one-month run.

Judy Chicago <i>Womanhouse</i> 1972

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Judy Chicago 19/70 1970
Judy Chicago 19/70

1970 - 19/70

In the spring, Chicago joined the faculty at Fresno State College to teach a women’s-only art program. She encouraged her students to communicate their experiences as women through their art, a ground-breaking and radical idea at the time. With hammers, saws and power tools in hand, the women renovated an old community theater into a 5,000-square-foot studio of their own. In 1971, Chicago wrote in her personal journal about her content-based approach to teaching art: “I want to begin to establish regular contact with the growth of the first Feminist Art ever attempted.” In her entry, she renamed her course the “Feminist Art Program.”

Judy Chicago Boxing Ring Ad

1970 - Boxing Ring Ad

In December, Artforum ran a full-page ad of Chicago posing like a pugilist in a boxing ring. The Fullerton show debuted Chicago's large, donut-shaped Pasadena Lifesavers, a series of 15 sprayed acrylic lacquer paintings on Plexiglas. Photograph by Jerry McMillan.

Judy Chicago Boxing Ring Ad 1970

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Judy Chicago Name Change 1970
Judy Chicago Name Change

1970 - Name Change

Gerowitz (Chicago) legally changed her name, which she announced in an ad for her solo show at Cal State Fullerton in the October Artforum magazine: “Judy Gerowitz hereby divests herself of all names imposed upon her through male social dominance and freely chooses her own name: Judy Chicago.”

Judy Chicago <i>Atmospheres</i>

1968 - Atmospheres

Through 1968 through 1974, Judy Gerowitz (Chicago) expanded her experimentation with altering environments with her work in flares and fireworks. Gerowitz (Chicago) enlisted her friends to travel all over Southern California and release colored smokes into the air in an attempt to “feminize” the atmosphere. She called these works Atmospheres.

Judy Chicago <i>Atmospheres</i> 1968

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Judy Chicago Pursuing a new medium: Fiberglass 1967
Judy Chicago Pursuing a new medium: Fiberglass

1967 - Pursuing a new medium: Fiberglass

Judy Gerowitz (Chicago) attended boat-building school in Long Beach, learning how to work in fiberglass. There, she created 10 Part Cylinder for the Sculpture of the Sixties exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Gerowitz (Chicago) was one of only five women artists included in the exhibition.

Judy Chicago <i>Rainbow Pickett</i>

1966 - Rainbow Pickett

The year began with Judy Gerowitz's (Chicago's) first solo show at Rolf Nelson Gallery. In April, Rainbow Pickett – named after soul singer Wilson Pickett – was featured in the Primary Structures show at New York’s Jewish Museum. Gerowitz (Chicago) was one of only a few women showing at this major minimalist exhibition, and Rainbow Pickett made Time Magazine’s review.

Judy Chicago <i>Rainbow Pickett</i> 1966

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Judy Chicago Spray Painting 1964
Judy Chicago Spray Painting

1964 - Spray Painting

Judy Gerowitz (Chicago) earned her master's degree in painting and sculpture from UCLA and was exhibiting in the nascent and extremely macho L.A. art scene. To learn how to spray paint, she enrolled in an auto body school, the only woman in the class of 250.

Judy Chicago 1963

1963 - 1963

Judy Gerowitz (Chicago) was widowed one month before she turned 24, when Jerry Gerowitz died in an automobile accident. They had married in the spring of 1961. She moved to Santa Monica and turned to her work -- large paintings on Masonite.

Judy Chicago 1963 1963

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Judy Chicago UCLA 1957
Judy Chicago UCLA

1957 - UCLA

Judy Cohen (Chicago) enrolled at UCLA where she majored in art and minored in humanities. The professor of Cohen's (Chicago's) Intellectual History of Europe class stated that women have made no contributions to history, igniting Cohen (Chicago) to search to prove him wrong, and eventually resulting in The Dinner Party).

Judy Chicago Losing a father

1953 - Losing a father

Judy Cohen's (Chicago's) father, Arthur Cohen, died from complications during surgery for an infected ulcer five days before her 14th birthday. Devastated, Cohen (Chicago) took refuge in her art.

Judy Chicago Losing a father 1953

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Judy Chicago A great teacher 1948
Judy Chicago A great teacher

1948 - A great teacher

At age eight, Judy Cohen (Chicago) began attending the Chicago Art Institute Junior School. She studied under the legendary, and beloved, teacher Emmanuel Jacobson, whose classical technique stresses still-life drawing and anatomy of animals as well as humans. She attended his weekly art classes for the next 10 years.

Judy Chicago Art at an early age

1943 - Art at an early age

Judy Cohen's (Chicago's) art received recognition from her pre-school teacher, who told Mrs. Cohen that her four-year-old daughter has talent. In 1945, Mrs. Cohen enrolled Chicago in Saturday classes at the Chicago Art Institute.

Judy Chicago Art at an early age 1943

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Judy Chicago Beginnings 1942
Judy Chicago Beginnings

1942 - Beginnings

Judith Sylvia Cohen, was born on July 20, 1939 to May and Arthur Cohen in Chicago, Illinois. She started drawing at age three. Cohen's (Chicago's) mother, a former dancer, encouraged her art. And her father, a political activist and labor organizer, valued equality and justice, which he instilled in his daughter.